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Inform          Today is Friday, October 02, 2020

White Matter Measure Can Predict Brain Development Risk In Preterm Infants

Informed 9 hours ago

A new software tool developed at Cincinnati Children’s that quantifies white matter abnormalities can help predict which preterm infants are most at risk for developing cognitive, language, motor, or behavioral disorders.  

Source:  Cincinnati Children's

Computer model explains altered decision making in schizophrenia

Informed 10 hours ago

Scientists have built a computer ‘brain circuit’, or artificial neural network, that mirrors human decision-making processes and sheds light on how circuits might be altered in psychiatric diseases  

Source:  eLife

New Research Provides Clues on Optimizing Cell Defenses When Viruses Attack

Informed 10 hours ago

Science’s pursuits of unraveling how human cells fight viral infections kicked into high gear in 2020 with the devastating emergence of the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

A study published recently in eLife by University of California San Diego scientists describes fresh details about the mechanisms involved when individual human cells are attacked by viruses, with possible implications for COVID-19 clinical treatment. The research helps advance science’s understanding of interferons, a key group of immune response proteins released naturally by human cells when a virus is detected.  

Source:  University of California - San Diego

Predator-Prey Interaction Study Reveals More Food Does Not Always Mean More Consumption

Informed 10 hours ago

Decades of data allow researchers to look at predator-prey interactions in a different way: among multiple species throughout the water column. They have developed an unusually rich picture of who is eating whom off the Northeastern United States.  

Source:  NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

New study finds antidepressant drug effective in treating “lazy eye” in adults

Informed 10 hours ago

In a new study, published in Current Biology, researchers from the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine reveal how subanesthetic ketamine, which is used for pain management and as an antidepressant in humans, is effective in treating adult amblyopia, a brain disorder commonly known as “lazy eye.”  

Source:  University of California - Irvine

AI Can Detect COVID-19 in the Lungs Like a Virtual Physician, New Study Shows

Informed 10 hours ago

A University of Central Florida researcher is part of a new study showing that artificial intelligence can be nearly as accurate as a physician in diagnosing COVID-19 in the lungs.

The study, recently published in Nature Communications, shows the new technique can also overcome some of the challenges of current testing.

Researchers demonstrated that an AI algorithm could be trained to classify COVID-19 pneumonia in computed tomography (CT) scans with up to 90 percent accuracy, as well as correctly identify positive cases 84 percent of the time and negative cases 93 percent of the time.  

Source:  University of Central Florida

Research confirms link between sleep apnea and Alzheimer’s disease

Informed yesterday at 03:35 PM

New research has confirmed long-suspected links between sleep apnea and Alzheimer’s disease, finding identical signs of brain damage in both conditions.  

Source:  RMIT University

Study suggests link between unexplained miscarriages and how women perceive men’s body odour

Informed yesterday at 03:33 PM

Women who have had repeated and unexplained pregnancy loss have an altered perception and brain response to men’s body odour.  

Source:  eLife

Discovery enables adult skin to regenerate like a newborn’s

Informed yesterday at 03:26 PM

A newly identified genetic factor allows adult skin to repair itself like the skin of a newborn babe. The discovery by Washington State University researchers has implications for better skin wound treatment as well as preventing some of the aging process in skin.  

Source:  Washington State University

Many ventilation systems may increase risk of COVID-19 exposure, study suggests

Informed yesterday at 03:23 PM

Ventilation systems in many modern office buildings, which are designed to keep temperatures comfortable and increase energy efficiency, may increase the risk of exposure to the coronavirus, particularly during the coming winter, according to research.  

Source:  University of Cambridge

Social media use linked with depression, secondary trauma during COVID-19

Informed yesterday at 03:21 PM

Researchers found that social media usage was related to both depression and secondary trauma during the early part of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Can’t stop checking social media for the latest COVID-19 health information? You might want to take a break, according to researchers at Penn State and Jinan University who discovered that excessive use of social media for COVID-19 health information is related to both depression and secondary trauma.  

Source:  Penn State

በህዝብ ተወካዮች ምክር ቤት የተዘጋጀ መጠይቅ

Informed yesterday at 12:32 PM

በህዝብ ተወካዮች ምክር ቤት የተዘጋጀ መጠይቅ  


160 genes linked to brain shrinkage in study of 45,000 adults

Informed 2 days ago

A new study implicates 160 genes in brain shrinkage seen on MRIs of 45,000 healthy adults. The shrinkage is in the cortex, the dimply outer layer of the brain that gives rise to thinking, awareness and action, and largely consists of gray matter.

The study, published Sept. 22 in the journal Nature Communications, examined 34 regions of the cortex in a discovery group of 22,894 individuals, then confirmed the findings in a replication group of 22,635 individuals.  

Source:  University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

Stem cells can repair Parkinson’s-damaged circuits in mouse brains

Informed 2 days ago

The mature brain is infamously bad at repairing itself following damage like that caused by trauma or strokes, or from degenerative diseases like Parkinson’s. Stem cells, which are endlessly adaptable, have offered the promise of better neural repair. But the brain’s precisely tuned complexity has stymied the development of clinical treatments.

In a new study addressing these hurdles, University of Wisconsin–Madison researchers demonstrated a proof-of-concept stem cell treatment in a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease. They found that neurons derived from stem cells can integrate well into the correct regions of the brain, connect with native neurons and restore motor functions.  

Source:  University of Wisconsin-Madison

The testimony of trees: how volcanic eruptions shaped 2000 years of world history

Informed 2 days ago

Researchers have shown that over the past two thousand years, volcanoes have played a larger role in natural temperature variability than previously thought, and their climatic effects may have contributed to past societal and economic change.  

Source:  University of Cambridge

1 in 3 Parents Plan to Skip Flu Shots for Their Kids During COVID-19 Pandemic

Informed 2 days ago

National Poll finds COVID-19 may not influence parents’ beliefs about the flu vaccine, with just 1/3 believing it’s more important for children to get vaccinated in 2020.

The pandemic doesn’t seem to be changing parents’ minds about the importance of the flu vaccine.  

Source:  Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Cancer's Hidden Vulnerabilities

Informed 2 days ago

One of the biggest challenges to the development of medical treatments for cancer is the fact that there is no single kind of cancer. Cancers derive from many kinds of cells and tissues, and each have their own characteristics, behaviors, and susceptibilities to anti-cancer drugs. A treatment that works on colon cancer might have little to no effect on lung cancer, for example.

So, to create effective treatments for a cancer, scientists seek insight into what make its cells tick. In a new paper appearing in Nature Communications, Caltech researchers show that a framework they developed, using a specialized type of microscopy, allows them to probe the metabolic processes inside cancer cells.  

Source:  California Institute of Technology

Genetic Differences in Fat Shape Men and Women’s Health Risks

Informed 2 days ago

New research is revealing how genetic differences in the fat in men’s and women’s bodies affect the diseases each sex is likely to get.

Researchers Mete Civelek, PhD, Warren Anderson, PhD, and their collaborators have determined that differences in fat storage and formation in men and women strongly affect the activity of 162 different genes found in fat tissue. Further, 13 of the genes come in variants that have different effects in men and women.  

Source:  University of Virginia Health System

COVID-19: Saliva tests could detect the silent carriers

Informed 2 days ago

Testing self-collected saliva samples could offer an easy and effective mass testing approach for detecting asymptomatic COVID-19.

Scientists at Hokkaido University and colleagues in Japan have demonstrated a quick and effective mass testing approach using saliva samples to detect individuals who have been infected with COVID-19 but are still not showing symptoms. Their findings were published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases.  

Source:  Hokkaido University

Avoiding environmental losses in quantum information systems

Informed 2 days ago

Through new techniques for generating ‘exceptional points’ in quantum information systems, researchers have minimised the transitions through which they lose information to their surrounding environments.  

Source:  Springer

Covid-19: Social distancing is more effective than travel bans

Informed 2 days ago

Travel bans will delay the peak of infection with days, while social distancing has a much stronger impact, amounting in up to 4 weeks delay, scientists report.  

Source:  University of Southern Denmark

COVID-19 infection may deplete testosterone, helping to explain male patients’ poorer prognosis – new study shows

Informed 2 days ago

Over half of male patients studied were found to have lower than their normal testosterone levels.
For the first time, data from a study with patients hospitalized due to COVID-19 suggest that the disease might deteriorate men’s testosterone levels.  

Source:  Taylor & Francis Group

Early introduction of gluten may prevent coeliac disease in children

Informed 2 days ago

Introducing high doses of gluten from four months of age into infants’ diets could prevent them from developing coeliac disease, a study has found.  

Source:  King's College London

Study links rising stress, depression in U.S. to pandemic-related losses, media consumption

Informed 2 days ago

Experiencing multiple stressors triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic such as unemployment – and COVID-19-related media consumption are directly linked to rising acute stress and depressive symptoms across the U.S., according to a groundbreaking University of California, Irvine study.  

Source:  University of California - Irvine

Strong activation of anti-bacterial T cells linked to severe COVID-19

Informed 2 days ago

A type of anti-bacterial T cells, so-called MAIT cells, are strongly activated in people with moderate to severe COVID-19 disease, according to a study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden that is published in the journal Science Immunology. The findings contribute to increased understanding about how our immune system responds against COVID-19 infection.  

Source:  Karolinska Institutet

Pandemic Sets Off Future Wave of Worsening Mental Health Issues

Informed 2 days ago

Long after a COVID-19 vaccination is developed and years after the coronavirus death toll is tallied, the impact on mental health will linger, continuing to inflict damage if not addressed, according to new research.  

Source:  University of Houston

Association of Rapid Eye Movement Sleep With Mortality in Middle-aged and Older Adults

Informed 3 days ago

Is less rapid eye movement (REM) sleep associated with increased mortality?

In this cross-sectional study of 4050 individuals from 2 independent cohorts, lower amounts of REM sleep were associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality. There was a 13% higher mortality rate over 12.1 years for every 5% reduction in REM sleep in a cohort of 2675 older men, and the finding was replicated in a cohort of 1375 middle-aged men and women followed-up for 20.8 years.

Less REM sleep is associated with increased mortality risk.  

Source:  JAMA Neurology

Study says COVID-19 vaccine trials may be excluding older adults

Informed 3 days ago

Experts say more than half of all trials are "at high risk" for exclusion and some included an age "cutoff" that shut out adults between 65 and 80 years old.  

Source:  UPI

ኮቪድ-19ኝን ተከትሎ የበዛው ፅንስ ውስጥ ሞተው የሚወለዱ ህፃናት ምጣኔ

Informed 3 days ago

የተለያዩ ጥናቶች እያመላከቱ እንዳሉት በዓለም ዙርያ በማህፀን ውስጥ ሞተው የሚወለዱ ህፃናት ምጣኔ በአሳሳቢ ፍጥነት እያደገ ነው፡፡ እንደ አጥኚዎች ከሆነ በአንዳንድ ሀገራት ነፍሰ ጡር ሴቶች ኮቪድ 19ኝን ተከትለው በመጡ ገደቦች ምክንያት ለወትሮው ሊያገኙት ይገባ የነበረው የጤና ባለሙያ ክትትል ተነፍጓቸዋል፡፡ በዚህ መንስኤነትም ህፃናት ሞተው እንዲወለዱ የሚያደርጉ የጤና እክሎች ተገቢውን ክትትል አላገኙም፡፡ በደቡብ አውስትራሊያ ዩኒቨርሲቲ በስነ ወሊድ ስፔሻሊስት እንደሆኑት ጄን ዋርላንድ አነጋገር “ነፍሰ ጡር ሴቶችን ከኮቪድ 19 ለመከላከል በምናደርገው ጥረት ባልታሰበ ሁኔታ በማህፀን ሞተው የሚወለዱ ህጻናትን ቁጥር አሳድገናል”፡፡  


Study delivers new knowledge about what causes thunderstorms and cloud bursts

Informed 3 days ago

Thunderstorms often provoke violent cloud bursts that can result in devastating flooding. But what actually spawns thunderstorms and cloud bursts? This question has spurred a new study by researchers at the University of Copenhagen — with surprising results.

Thunderstorms are weather disturbances characterized by concentrations of thunder, lightning and fierce winds. When they accumulate in clusters, these storms are often accompanied by violent cloud bursts and flooding, which can devastate the areas affected.  

Source:  University of Copenhagen

The male Y chromosome does more than we thought

Informed 3 days ago

While the Y chromosome’s role was believed to be limited to the functions of the sexual organs, an UdM scientist has shown that it impacts the functions of other organs as well.

New light is being shed on a little-known role of Y chromosome genes, specific to males, that could explain why men suffer differently than women from various diseases, including Covid-19.  

Source:  University of Montreal

Adequate Levels of Vitamin D Reduces Complications, Death Among COVID-19 Patients

Informed 4 days ago

“This study provides direct evidence that vitamin D sufficiency can reduce the complications, including the cytokine storm (release of too many proteins into the blood too quickly) and ultimately death from COVID-19,”  

Source:  Boston University School of Medicine

Surgical, N95 Masks Block Most Particles; Homemade Cloth Masks Release Their Own

Informed 4 days ago

Laboratory tests of surgical and N95 masks by researchers at the University of California, Davis, show that they do cut down the amount of aerosolized particles emitted during breathing, talking and coughing. Tests of homemade cloth face coverings, however, show that the fabric itself releases a large amount of fibers into the air, underscoring the importance of washing them.  

Source:  University of California, Davis

COVID-19 Spurs Anxious, Upsetting Dreams

Informed 4 days ago

The anxiety, stress and worry brought on by COVID-19 is not limited to daytime hours. The pandemic is affecting our dreams as well, infusing more anxiety and negative emotions into dreams and spurring dreams about the virus itself, particularly among women, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.  

Source:  American Psychological Association

Faced with pandemic shortages, researchers combine heat and humidity to disinfect N95 masks for reuse

Informed 4 days ago

Researchers found that gently heating N95 masks in high relative humidity could inactivate SARS-CoV-2 virus trapped within the masks, without degrading the masks’ performance.  

Source:  DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Last-Resort Life Support Option Helped Majority of Critically Ill COVID-19 Patients Survive, Global Study Shows

Informed 4 days ago

It saved lives in past epidemics of lung-damaging viruses. Now, the life-support option known as ECMO appears to be doing the same for many of the critically ill COVID-19 patients who receive the treatment, according to a new international study.  

Source:  Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Carriers of two genetic mutations at greater risk for severe illness and death from COVID-19

Informed 4 days ago

Tel Aviv University researchers suggest that carriers of the genetic mutations PiZ and PiS are at high risk for severe illness and even death from COVID-19. These mutations lead to deficiency in the alpha1-antitrypsin protein, which protects lung tissues from damage in case of severe infections. Other studies have already associated deficiency in this protein with inflammatory damage to lung function in other diseases.  

Source:  American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Having pets linked to maintaining better mental health and reducing loneliness during lockdown, research shows

Informed 4 days ago

Sharing a home with a pet appeared to act as a buffer against psychological stress during lockdown, a new survey shows.  

Source:  University of York

ቀለም እና ብሔራዊ ማንነት

Informed 5 days ago

ቀለሞችን አይተን በውስጣችን የሚከሰቱት የደስታ፣ ሀዘን፣ ፍቅር፣ ኩራት እና ሌሎች ስሜቶች በሀገራዊ ማንነታችን ላይ የተመሰረቱ እንደሆነ የሚያሳይ ጥናት በቅርብ ይፋ ሆኖ ነበር፡፡ በዚህም አጥኚዎች አንድ ሰው ከየትኞቹ ቀለሞች ጋራ የስሜት ትስስር እንዳለው በመመልከት ብቻ ሰውየው የየት ሀገር ሰው እንደሆነ መገመት ችለዋል፤ ከግምቶቻቸው ውስጥም 80 በመቶ ያህሉ ትክክል ሆነው ተገኝተዋል፡፡  


World-first study links obesity with reduced brain plasticity

Informed 5 days ago

A world-first study has found that severely overweight people are less likely to be able to re-wire their brains and find new neural pathways, a discovery that has significant implications for people recovering from a stroke or brain injury.  

Source:  University of South Australia

UNUSUAL CLIMATE CONDITIONS INFLUENCED WWI MORTALITY AND SUBSEQUENT SPANISH FLU PANDEMIC

Informed 5 days ago

Scientists have spotted a once-in-a-century climate anomaly during World War I that likely increased mortality during the war and the influenza pandemic in the years that followed.  

Source:  American Geophysical Union

Primate brain size does not predict their intelligence

Informed 5 days ago

Chimpanzees, gorillas and orangutans are our closest relatives, and like us they have relatively large brains and they are very intelligent. But do animals with larger brains really perform better in cognitive tests? A research team from the German Primate Center (DPZ) - Leibniz Institute for Primate Research in Göttingen has for the first time systematically investigated the cognitive abilities of lemurs, which have relatively small brains compared to other primates. Conducting systematic tests with identical methods revealed that cognitive abilities of lemurs hardly differ from those of monkeys and great apes. Instead, this study revealed that the relationship between brain size and cognitive abilities cannot be generalized and it provides new insights into the evolution of cognitive abilities in primates  

Source:  Deutsches Primatenzentrum (DPZ)/German Primate Center

How do Americans view the virus? NAU anthropology professor examines attitudes, perceptions of COVID-19

Informed 5 days ago

A new study looks at how Americans' attitudes and responses have changed during the time of the pandemic and how to many people, the virus is not a biological agent but instead a malicious actor.  

Source:  Northern Arizona University

Research challenges conventional wisdom about key autism trait

Informed 5 days ago

A new study into the causes of sensorimotor impairments prevalent among autistic people could pave the way for better treatment and management in the future, say psychologists.  

Source:  University of Bath

What new research reveals about rude workplace emails

Informed 5 days ago

Researchers found rude emails at work can lead to significant distress for employees.

The researchers say that “active” email rudeness is overloaded with strong negative emotions. By comparison, “passive” email rudeness leaves people struggling with uncertainty.

Passive email rudeness may create problems for employees’ sleep, which further puts them in a negative emotional state the next morning, thus creating a vicious cycle.  

Source:  University of Illinois at Chicago

Hostility linked with higher risk of death after second heart attacks

Informed 2 weeks ago

Heart attack patients who are sarcastic or irritable could be putting their health at risk, according to research published in the European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).1

“Hostility is a personality trait that includes being sarcastic, cynical, resentful, impatient or irritable,” said study author Dr. Tracey Vitori of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, US. “It’s not just a one-off occurrence but characterises how a person interacts with people. We know that taking control of lifestyle habits improves the outlook for heart attack patients and our study suggests that improving hostile behaviours could also be a positive move.”  

Source:  European Society of Cardiology

Lab-grown bone could change the way we test new medical treatments

Informed 2 weeks ago

A new technology that could be used to test new treatments for human organs and bone tissue—all whilst reducing the need for animal research—has been developed by engineers at the University of Sheffield.

The study, led by researchers from the University's Department of Materials Science and Engineering and the Insigneo Institute for in silico Medicine, along with collaborators from Universitat Ramon Llull, Spain, developed a bone-on-a-chip device containing mini scaffolding that can be used to grow human bone tissue in the laboratory.
 

Source:  Medical Xpress

Loneliness and disabled people

Informed 2 weeks ago

Research by Sense has shown that up to 50% of disabled people will be lonely on any given day.  

Source:  Campaign to End Loneliness

Loneliness and people of all ages

Informed 2 weeks ago

A study by The Co-op and the British Red Cross reveals over 9 million people in the UK across all adult ages – more than the population of London – are either always or often lonely.

Research commissioned by Eden Project initiative The Big Lunch found that disconnected communities could be costing the UK economy £32 billion every year.  

Source:  Campaign to End Loneliness

Tips for conquering loneliness

Informed 2 weeks ago

1. Connect meaningfully:- with family and friends. Although technology can help foster connections, it is imperfect: social media, for example, has actually been linked to increasing loneliness. Connect in a way that works best for you: whether by phone, via video chat, through a mobile application, or even by talking with your neighbors across the fence or in a park.
2. Be thankful:- Loneliness can lead people to focus on themselves and their hardships. Aim to express appreciation toward friends, family, and strangers.
3. Focus on what you can change:- Spending time dwelling on your current situation can perpetuate loneliness; rather, focus your attention on something within your control and work at it.
4. Enjoy being busy:- Complete a chore, spend time writing, find a new hobby, or just allow yourself to delve into a new activity. Let your creativity shine!
5. Remove negativity:- Surround yourself with people and activities that bring you joy. Consider taking a break from the news, or at least limiting your consumption.
Data suggest that just the act of smiling can make you feel better.
6. Be kind, understanding, and patient:- Work on treating yourself and others with compassion. Engaging in pleasurable interactions can also help those around you, and may result in deeper connections.
7. Develop a routine that provides balance and familiarity:- Create a daily plan that includes physical activity, time for connecting with loved ones, a project or hobby, and a relaxing pleasure.  

Source:  Harvard University

Limiting Social Media Decreases Loneliness and Depression

Informed 2 weeks ago

Given the breadth of correlational research linking social media use to worse well-being, we undertook an experimental study to investigate the potential causal role that social media plays in this relationship.

After a week of baseline monitoring, 143 undergraduates at the University of Pennsylvania were randomly assigned to either limit Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat use to 10 minutes, per platform, per day, or to use social media as usual for three weeks.

The limited use group showed significant reductions in loneliness and depression over three weeks compared to the control group. Both groups showed significant decreases in anxiety and fear of missing out over baseline, suggesting a benefit of increased self-monitoring.

The findings strongly suggest that limiting social media use to approximately 30 minutes per day may lead to significant improvement in well-being.  

Source:  Guilford Press

AstraZeneca Resumes Covid-19 Vaccine Trials in the U.K

Informed 2 weeks ago

A large, United Kingdom-based Phase 2/3 study testing a Covid-19 vaccine being developed by AstraZeneca has been restarted, according to a statement from the company. News that the trial is resuming comes four days after the disclosure that it had been paused because of a suspected serious adverse reaction in a participant. A spokesperson for AstraZeneca told STAT that at this point, only the trial in the U.K. has been resumed. The company is also conducting Phase 2/3 or Phase 3 trials in the U.S., Brazil, and South Africa.  

Source:  Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security and STAT News

China’s Coronavirus Vaccine Shows Military’s Growing Role in Medical Research

Informed 2 weeks ago

The largest armed force in the world, China’s People’s Liberation Army (PLA), is not known for its cutting edge medical research. But since 2015, it has ramped up recruitment of scientists, and investment in the field as part of its strategy to modernize its military. Now, the coronavirus pandemic is showcasing the PLA's growing expertise in medical research, including a major role in developing the coronavirus vaccine that was the first in the world to be approved for restricted use.  

Source:  Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security and Nature

Children Use Both Brain Hemispheres to Understand Language, Unlike Adults

Informed 3 weeks ago

Infants and young children have brains with a superpower, of sorts, say Georgetown University Medical Center neuroscientists. Whereas adults process most discrete neural tasks in specific areas in one or the other of their brain’s two hemispheres, youngsters use both the right and left hemispheres to do the same task. The finding suggests a possible reason why children appear to recover from neural injury much easier than adults.  

Source:  Georgetown University Medical Center

Earth may temporarily pass dangerous 1.5℃ warming limit by 2024, major new report says

Informed 3 weeks ago

The Paris climate agreement seeks to limit global warming to 1.5℃ this century. A new report by the World Meteorological Organisation warns this limit may be exceeded by 2024 – and the risk is growing.  

Source:  The Conversation

የኦክስፎርድ ዩንቨርስቲ ተቋርጦ የነበረውን የኮቪድ 19 ክትባት ሙከራ ሊቀጥል ነው

Informed 3 weeks ago

በጊዜያዊነት ተቋርጦ የነበረው በኦክስፎርድ ዩንቨርስቲና በአስትራዜኒካ ሲዘጋጅ የነበረው የኮቪድ 19 ክትባት ሙከራ እንዲቀጥል ሊደረግ መሆኑ ተገለጸ።
ባለፈው ማክሰኞ ዕለት የክትባቱ በእንግሊዝ አንድ ታካሚ ላይ ሲሞከር የጎንዮሽ ጉዳት በማሳየቱ ተቋርጦ እንደነበርም ተገልጿል።
እንደ ቢ ቢ ሲ ዘገባ ዩንቨርስቲው የክትባቱን ሙከራ ለማስቀጠል የደህንነት ማረጋጋጫ ሰጥቷል።
የአገሪቱ የጤና ዘርፍ ሀላፊ ማት ሃንኮክ የዩንቨርስቲውን መግለጫ በአዎንታዊ መልኩ መቀበላቸው የተገለጸ ሲሆን፤ ምንግዜም ቢሆን ቅድሚያ ለደህንነት እንደሚሰጥና ሳይንቲስቶች ውጤታማና ደህንነቱ የተጠበቀ ክትባት እንዲያዘጋጁ ድጋፍ እንደሚደረግ መናገራቸው ተጠቅሷል።
የክትባቱ ሙከራ በስፋት ሲካሄድ አንዳንድ ከትባቱን የወሰዱ ሰዎች ላይ ህመም ሊታይ ይችላል ተብሎ እንደሚጠበቅ ዩንቨርስቲው መግለጹም ተመልክቷል።
ገለልተኛ በሆነ አካል የክትባቱ ደህንነት በተመለከተ አስተያየት በሚሰጥበት ወቅት ክትባቱ ላይ የሚከናወነው ምርምር ሊቀጥል እንደሚችልም ተገልጿል።
የአለም የጤና ድርጅት እንዳስታወቀው በተለያዩ አገራት ወደ 180 የሚደርሱ የክትባት አይነቶች ሙከራ ላይ መሆናቸው የተገለጸ ሲሆን፤ ክሊኒካዊ ሙከራዎችን ያጠናቀቀ ክትባት አለመኖሩ ተጠቁሟል።  


Biological Sex Affects Genes for Body Fat, Cancer, Birth Weight

Informed 3 weeks ago

Biological sex has a small but ubiquitous influence on gene expression — the amount of product created by a gene for cell function — in almost every type of human tissue, according to a new study published in Science.

These sex differences are observed for genes involved in many functions, including how people respond to medication, how women control blood sugar levels in pregnancy, how the immune system functions, and how cancer develops, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study done in collaboration with the University of Chicago and the Centre for Genomic Regulation in Barcelona.  

Source:  Northwestern University

Veterinary college team IDs gene that drives ovarian cancer

Informed 3 weeks ago

High-grade serious ovarian carcinoma (HGSOC) is the fifth-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women in the United States, yet little is known about the origins of this disease.

Now, scientists at the College of Veterinary Medicine have collaborated on a study that pinpoints which specific genes drive – or delay – this deadly cancer.  

Source:  Cornell University

COVID ventilator patients can have permanent nerve damage

Informed 3 weeks ago

Severely ill COVID-19 patients on ventilators are placed in a prone (face down) position because it’s easier for them to breathe and reduces mortality. But that life-saving position can also cause permanent nerve damage in these vulnerable patients, reports a newly accepted study from Shirley Ryan AbilityLab and Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

Scientists believe the nerve damage is the result of reduced blood flow (due to coagulated blood) and inflammation. Other non-COVID-19 patients on ventilators in this position rarely experience any nerve damage.  

Source:  Northwestern University

Site of male sexual desire uncovered in brain

Informed 3 weeks ago

The locus of male sexual desire has been uncovered in specific regions of brain tissue where a key gene named aromatase is present, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study in mice.

The gene regulates sexual behavior in men, and thus can be targeted by drugs to either increase its function for low sexual desire or decrease its function for compulsive sexual desire, scientists said. Aromatase converts testosterone to estrogen in the brain, which drives male sexual activity.  

Source:  Medical Xpress

Depression risk detected by measuring heart rate changes

Informed 3 weeks ago

For the first time doctors have shown that measuring changes in 24-hour heart rate can reliably indicate whether or not someone is depressed. In practical terms, this may give clinicians an objective "early warning" of potential depression, as well as a rapid indication whether or not treatment is working, so opening the way to more rapid and responsive treatment. Presenting results of this pilot study at the ECNP virtual congress, lead researcher, Dr. Carmen Schiweck (Goethe University, Frankfurt) said "Put simply, our pilot study suggests that by just measuring your heart rate for 24 hours, we can tell with 90% accuracy if a person is currently depressed or not."  

Source:  Medical Xpress

Increases in Suicide Rates in Young Adults From 2000 to 2018

Informed 3 weeks ago

From 2000 to 2018, there were increases in suicide rates among persons aged 10 to 24 years, according to the Sept. 11 National Vital Statistics Reports, a publication from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Curtin found that from 2000 to 2007, nationally, the suicide rate was statistically stable among persons aged 10 to 24 years, then increased 57.4 percent from 6.8 to 10.7 per 100,000 from 2007 to 2018. In 42 states, there were significant increases in suicide rates between 2007-2009 and 2016-2018, while nonsignificant increases were seen in eight states; due to small numbers, the change in the District of Columbia could not be assessed. There was variation noted in the increases, from 21.7 percent in Maryland to a more than doubling in New Hampshire (110 percent). The suicide rates were highest in Alaska in 2016-2018, while some of the lowest rates were seen among states in the Northeast.  

Source:  HealthDay

Healthy diet and exercise during pregnancy could lead to healthier children, study finds

Informed 3 weeks ago

New research shows improving the lifestyle of women with obesity during pregnancy could mean long-term cardiovascular benefits for their children.

The study, led by King’s and supported by the British Heart Foundation and Tommy’s charity, examined how an antenatal diet and physical activity intervention in pregnant women with obesity could positively influence the health of the women and their children three years after giving birth.
 

Source:  King's College London

Better stress management is beneficial to newborns

Informed 3 weeks ago

A group of researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have been able to show that maternal psychological wellbeing during pregnancy has a positive effect on newborn infants. Increased telomere length suggests a reduced rate of cell aging, which could have an effect on children's future health. Results from this study have been published in the American Journal of Psychiatry.  

Source:  Medical Xpress

Ten minutes of massage or rest will help your body fight stress: study

Informed 3 weeks ago

Allowing yourself a few minutes of downtime significantly boosts mental and physical relaxation. Research by psychologists at the University of Konstanz observed higher levels of psychological and physiological relaxation in people after only ten minutes of receiving a massage. Even ten minutes of simple rest increased relaxation, albeit to a lesser degree than massage. The findings, reported on 8 September 2020 in the journal Scientific Reports, provide the first indication that short-term treatments can robustly reduce stress on a psychological and physiological level by boosting the body's principal engine for relaxation—the parasympathetic nervous system (PNS).  

Source:  Medical Xpress

Alcohol and your brain: study finds even moderate drinking is damaging

Informed 3 weeks ago

It’s a well-known fact that drinking too much alcohol can have a serious impact on your health, including damaging your liver. But how much is too much? For conditions such as liver cirrhosis, that’s usually more than 21 units of alcohol a week – around two bottles of wine a week or one and a half pints of beer a day. The UK’s Chief Medical Officer recommends that adults don’t drink more than 14 units of alcohol a week to keep the risk of health problems low.

However, the liver isn’t the only organ that can be damaged by drinking – the brain can be damaged, too. Drinking over the current UK low-risk guidelines is associated with an increased risk of dementia. And a recent study, published in Scientific Reports, found that even moderate drinking is associated with decreased brain volume.  

Source:  The Conversation

Phone Calls Create Stronger Bonds Than Text-Based Communications

Informed 3 weeks ago

After months of social distancing mandates, people are leaning heavily on technology for a sense of social connection. But new research from The University of Texas at Austin suggests people too often opt to send email or text messages when a phone call is more likely to produce the feelings of connectedness they crave.  

Source:  University of Texas at Austin

Coronavirus Pandemic Affects Young Adults’ Mental Health More Than Older Americans: Poll

Informed 3 weeks ago

Speaking of mental health: a recent poll found that the pandemic is affecting the mental health of young adults more than older Americans.  

Source:  Forbes and National Opinion Research Center

People prefer coronavirus contact tracing to be carried out by a combination of apps and humans, study shows

Informed 3 weeks ago

People prefer coronavirus contact tracing to be carried out by a combination of apps and humans, a new study shows.  

Source:  University of Exeter

Researchers Publish Striking Images of SARS-CoV-2 Infected Cells

Informed 3 weeks ago

The UNC School of Medicine lab of Camille Ehre, PhD, generated high-powered microscopic images showing startlingly high SARS-CoV-2 viral loads on human respiratory surfaces, ready to spread infection in infected individuals and transmit infection to others.  

Source:  University of North Carolina Health Care

Seven in 10 Americans willing to get COVID-19 vaccine, survey finds

Informed 3 weeks ago

Almost seven in 10 Americans would be interested in receiving a COVID-19 vaccine when one becomes available, according to a new study. But researchers say there are concerning gaps in interest, particularly among Black Americans, who suffer disproportionately from the virus.  

Source:  Ohio State University

Clinical Outcomes in Young US Adults Hospitalized With COVID-19

Informed 3 weeks ago

Young adults age 18 to 34 years hospitalized with COVID-19 experienced substantial rates of adverse outcomes: 21% required intensive care, 10% required mechanical ventilation, and 2.7% died. This in-hospital mortality rate is lower than that reported for older adults with COVID-19, but approximately double that of young adults with acute myocardial infarction.4 Morbid obesity, hypertension, and diabetes were common and associated with greater risks of adverse events. Young adults with more than 1 of these conditions faced risks comparable with those observed in middle-aged adults without them. More than half of these patients requiring hospitalization were Black or Hispanic, consistent with prior findings of disproportionate illness severity in these demographic groups.  

Source:  Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security and JAMA

Changes in Diet, Sleep, and Physical Activity Are Associated With Differences in Negative Mood During COVID-19 Lockdown

Informed 3 weeks ago

Changes in Diet, Sleep, and Physical Activity Are Associated With Differences in Negative Mood During COVID-19 Lockdown.  

Source:  FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY

Study Suggests Unconscious Learning Underlies Belief in God

Informed 3 weeks ago

Individuals who can unconsciously predict complex patterns, an ability called implicit pattern learning, are likely to hold stronger beliefs that there is a god who creates patterns of events in the universe, according to neuroscientists at Georgetown University.  

Source:  Georgetown University Medical Center

More than one drink a day may raise high blood pressure risk in adults with Type 2 diabetes

Informed 3 weeks ago

In a large study of adults with Type 2 diabetes, moderate drinking (defined as eight or more alcoholic beverages a week) was associated with a 60% or higher increased risk of high blood pressure.

The severity of high blood pressure also increased with eight or more drinks per week.  

Source:  American Heart Association

Vitamin B1 deficiency a key factor in the development of alcohol-related dementia

Informed 3 weeks ago

A common consequence of chronically high alcohol consumption is a decline in cognitive function, which can even progress to full-blown dementia. However, we do not yet fully understand how alcohol damages the brain. A research group led by Stephan Listabarth from MedUni Vienna's Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Division of Social Psychiatry, has now developed a hypothesis whereby iron deposits in the brain – resulting from alcohol-induced vitamin B1 deficiency – can be regarded as key factors in cognitive decline.  

Source:  Medical University of Vienna

More cats might be COVID-19 positive than first believed, study suggests

Informed 3 weeks ago

Study shows cats are fighting off the virus with naturally developed antibodies – however they could be at risk of reinfection

A newly published study looking at cats in Wuhan, where the first known outbreak of COVID-19 began, shows more cats might be contracting the disease than first believed.  

Source:  Taylor & Francis Group

New insight on the impacts of Earth’s biosphere on air quality

Informed 3 weeks ago

A new study led by a team of University of Minnesota researchers provides the first global satellite measurements of one of the most important chemicals affecting Earth’s atmosphere.  

Source:  University of Minnesota

Survey finds our relationships are our main source of support when struggling with our mental health

Informed 3 weeks ago

1. 96% of people say that they can tell if their mental health is suffering, 95% of people said they know when a close companion’s mental health is suffering (figure 2). These figures have not changed significantly since 2015.

2. People feel most comfortable talking about their mental health with their partners and
friends and least comfortable with their neighbours and colleagues.

3. 99% of respondents felt confident in addressing another’s mental ill health. However, less than 60% of respondents thought they would receive tangible support when discussing their mental health with people close to them.  

Source:  The Relationships Australia

NPR Poll: Financial Pain From Coronavirus Pandemic 'Much, Much Worse' Than Expected

Informed 3 weeks ago

In America's four largest cities, at least half of people say they have experienced the loss of a job or a reduction in wages or work hours in their household since the start of the coronavirus outbreak. That's the finding of a new poll published Wednesday by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.  

Source:  Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security and NPR

China's Sinovac Coronavirus Vaccine Candidate Appears Safe, Slightly Weaker in Elderly

Informed 3 weeks ago

Chinese firm Sinovac Biotech Ltd (SVA.O) said on Monday its coronavirus vaccine candidate appeared to be safe for older people, according to preliminary results from an early to mid-stage trial, while the immune responses triggered by the vaccine were slightly weaker than younger adults.  

Source:  Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security and Reuters

Why COVID-19 Is More Deadly in People with Obesity—Even if They're Young

Informed 3 weeks ago

A constellation of physiological and social factors drives those grim numbers. The biology of obesity includes impaired immunity, chronic inflammation, and blood that’s prone to clot, all of which can worsen COVID-19. And because obesity is so stigmatized, people with obesity may avoid medical care.  

Source:  Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security and Science

CHINA VACCINE EFFICACY

Informed 3 weeks ago

Chinese pharmaceutical company SinoVac reportedly announced preliminary results from Phase 3 clinical trials for its candidate SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, CoronaVac. Reuters reports that SinoVac officials described early safety and efficacy data from the Phase 3 trials, but the full data have not been published publicly. According to the company officials, the vaccine continues to exhibit an acceptable safety profile and generate an immune response in recipients. More than 90% of the study participants so far developed antibodies following vaccination following 2 doses of “low, medium, or high-dose” vaccine. Notably, the vaccine appears to generate an immune response in older individuals, but it is not as strong as in younger recipients. The Phase 3 trials are ongoing in Brazil and Indonesia.  

Source:  Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security

RUSSIA VACCINE OPPOSITION

Informed 3 weeks ago

Some frontline healthcare workers and other essential workers (e.g., teachers) in Russia are reportedly expressing opposition to the use of Russia’s candidate SARS-CoV-2 vaccine before the completion of Phase 3 clinical trials. Russia announced initial approval for the vaccine following limited Phase 1 and 2 clinical trials, and it reportedly intends to begin administering the vaccine to essential workers in advance of larger Phase 3 clinical trials. The vaccine is currently available on a voluntary basis; however, some teachers and other essential workers have raised concerns that it could become mandatory before Phase 3 trials are complete, whether mandated by the government, schools, or other employers. Russia’s “Uchitel” teacher’s union circulated a “petition against compulsory vaccination for teachers” in anticipation that this could become a problem in the future. Those opposing the vaccine emphasize that there is tremendous pressure on teachers and healthcare workers, in particular, to get vaccinated, but there is also considerable concern about the safety and efficacy of the vaccine.  

Source:  Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security

Older Women with Type 2 Diabetes Have Different Patterns of Blood Use in Their Brains

Informed 3 weeks ago

A University of Houston researcher is reporting that the brains of older women with Type 2 diabetes do not use as much oxygenated blood as those who don’t have the disease. The research is the first to point to changes in blood use in the brain as the primary reason for diabetes-related deficits in motor function. It also furthers the understanding of sensory and motor symptoms as a precursor to developing dementia and Alzheimer’s diseases, both of which are linked to diabetes.  

Source:  University of Houston

How birth control, girls’ education can slow population growth

Informed 3 weeks ago

Widespread use of contraceptives and, to a lesser extent, girls’ education through at least age 14 have the greatest impact in bringing down a country’s fertility rate.

Education and family planning have long been tied to lower fertility trends. But new research from the University of Washington analyzes those factors to determine, what accelerates a decline in otherwise high-fertility countries.  

Source:  University of Washington

Recent WHO

Informed 3 weeks ago

A recent WHO survey based on responses from 105 countries revealed that 52 per cent of countries reported disruptions in health services for sick children and 51 per cent in services for management of malnutrition.  

Source:  world health organization

UNICEF survey

Informed 3 weeks ago

A UNICEF survey conducted over the summer across 77 countries found that almost 68 per cent of countries reported at least some disruption in health checks for children and immunization services. In addition, 63 per cent of countries reported disruptions in antenatal checkups and 59 per cent in post-natal care.  

Source:  world health organization and UNICEF

Even 80% empty stadiums linked to higher COVID-19 cases and deaths

Informed 3 weeks ago

Professional football matches played before lockdown, even those in near-empty stadiums, were linked to higher COVID-19 cases and deaths in the local area, a study has found.

The findings suggest that reopening stadiums with reduced capacities is unlikely to reduce rates of transmission on its own, without effective social distancing measures for fans before, during and after matches.  

Source:  Medical Xpress

The impact of sound on nurses’ task performance in hospitals

Informed 3 weeks ago

The impact of the indoor sound environment on building occupants has received an increasing amount of attention over the past years. It is well recognized that the sound environment can cause stress, disturbance, and affects cognitive task performance. The PhD research of Jikke Reinten, who will defend her thesis on 9 September 2020, focused on the sound environment in hospitals and its effect on nurses’ task performance, which plays an important role in patient outcomes and patient satisfaction.  

Source:  Eindhoven University of Technology

The impact of confinement on pregnant women

Informed 3 weeks ago

Researchers of Medicine and Physical Therapy at the CEU Cardenal Herrera University of Valencia and of the Italian University of Catania, have published the results of the first study on the effects of confinement due to the COVID-19 pandemic among pregnant Spanish women. A total 90 women took part in the study. The decrease in general physical activity and the higher number of hours sitting down have had the greatest effect on the lifestyle of pregnant women, derived from the mobility restrictions implemented during the confinement.  

Source:  Medical Xpress

Older women with type 2 diabetes have different patterns of blood use in their brains

Informed 3 weeks ago

A University of Houston researcher is reporting that the brains of older women with Type 2 diabetes do not use as much oxygenated blood as those who don't have the disease. The research is the first to point to changes in blood use in the brain as the primary reason for diabetes-related deficits in motor function. It also furthers the understanding of sensory and motor symptoms as a precursor to developing dementia and Alzheimer's diseases, both of which are linked to diabetes.  

Source:  Medical Xpress

Type 2 Diabetes May Lead to Short-Term Memory Loss

Informed 3 weeks ago

Type 2 diabetes, which has been found to impact dexterity and sensory function in the hands, may also impact the short-term memory of those living with the disease.  

Source:  University of Houston

Immune-boosting cancer treatment may pose cardiovascular risk

Informed 3 weeks ago

A type of cancer treatment used to boost the body's immune system may worsen inflammation in the arteries that distribute blood from the heart, according to a small study.  

Source:  Medical Xpress

Maternal obesity may alter fetal brain development

Informed 3 weeks ago

Obesity in pregnant women may impact the development of their offspring's brains, according to a study published online Aug. 10 in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.  

Source:  Medical Xpress

Social media 'likes' and comments lead to poorer self-esteem

Informed 3 weeks ago

Girls who "like" and comment on what others post on social media develop a worse self-image over time. Posting on your own profile doesn't have the same effect.

the findings indicate that girls who over time "like" and comment others' posts more and more, develop a poorer physical self-image.

Research shows that women are more likely than men to use social media to compare themselves to others. Social comparison also has a stronger negative effect on women's body image than it does on men's body image. These reasons may explain some of the difference.  

Source:  Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Medical Xpress

Study reveals strong early weight loss leads to longer-term success

Informed 3 weeks ago

New analysis by CSIRO, Australia's national science agency, has revealed that a stronger start in the first three weeks of a diet is linked to greater weight loss success in the longer-term.

The study of over 22,000 CSIRO Total Wellbeing Diet members showed those who started strongest in their weight loss journey were able to lose 1kg or more per week for the first three weeks; and overall achieve three and a half times greater total weight loss than those who had a slower start to the 12-week program.  

Source:  Medical Xpress

Delayed immune responses may drive COVID-19 mortality rates among men and the elderly

Informed 3 weeks ago

Researchers found that immune cell responses were not activated until after three days following the onset of infection, and that immune cell composition and function fluctuated with viral loads, in a way that suggested a dysfunctional antiviral response in males and the elderly. While these findings have important implications for development of immunomodulatory treatments for SARS-CoV-2, additional studies are needed as swabs were taken from the nasopharynx, which is not a sensitive anatomic location for accurately examining markers of systemic inflammation.

Elderly individuals as well as men have suffered higher mortality rates since the onset of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic and may indicate weaker immune responses underlying poor clinical outcomes. According to the authors, "Collectively, our data demonstrate that host responses to SARS-CoV-2 are dependent on viral load and infection time with observed differences due to age and sex that may contribute to disease severity."  

Source:  Medical Xpress

Study highlights possible causes of racial disparities in prostate cancer deaths

Informed 3 weeks ago

New research provides insights on the potential causes of racial disparities in deaths following prostate cancer surgery. The findings are published early online in Cancer, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society (ACS).

Black men not only have a higher rate of developing prostate cancer compared with white men, but they're also more than twice as likely to die from the disease. Meanwhile, Asian American and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) have the lowest rates of death from prostate cancer among all races.  

Source:  Medical Xpress

Vitamin D levels in the blood can predict future health risks and death

Informed 3 weeks ago

Free, circulating vitamin D levels in the blood may be a better predictor of future health risks in aging men, according to a study being presented at e-ECE 2020. These data suggest the free, precursor form of vitamin D found circulating in the bloodstream is a more accurate predictor of future health and disease risk, than the often measured total vitamin D. Since vitamin D deficiency is associated with multiple serious health conditions as we get older, this study suggests that further investigation into vitamin D levels and their link to poor health may be a promising area for further research.  

Source:  Medical Xpress

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